Saskatchewan Huskies men’s hockey team frustrated by split with UBC

Written by admin on 14/11/2018 Categories: 长沙夜网

SASKATOON – The University of Saskatchewan played some of their best hockey of the season Saturday against UBC but it wasn’t enough, as the Thunderbirds defeated the Huskies 4-3 at Rutherford Rink on a late goal by Austin Vetterl and forced a split of their weekend series.

“There’s a lot of pretty pissed off guys in [the locker room],” said Huskies head coach Dave Adolph. “They’re used to winning and they’re used to finishing games like that and it just didn’t happen.”

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Despite outshooting UBC 29-5 over the final two periods, a slow start proved to be the Huskies’ undoing.

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“We spotted them a 3-0 lead and then they had one scoring chance in the last 40 minutes,” said Adolph.

“Not getting pucks to the net and not being careful in our d-zone. We were a little scared and we weren’t committed all the way,” added forward Levi Cable, who scored twice for Saskatchewan.

A win would have given the first-place Huskies a seven-point lead on UBC in the Canada West standings. Instead, they fall to 10-2-0 and now sit just three points clear of both the Thunderbirds and the Alberta Golden Bears – the only other team to beat the Dogs this season.

But while the Huskies are frustrated, they won’t be hanging their heads over the loss.

“The record speaks for itself and I think every game we’re coming out and we play to win,” said Jordan Fransoo, who assisted all three Huskies goals. “We’re not happy with the way things ended up [tonight] but I think we’re making a bit of a statement this year.”

The Huskies will look to get back in the win column Nov. 20 when they visit the University of Manitoba Bisons.

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